Accessible Gaming

Steve SpohnBy Steve Spohn
Editor-In-Chief, The AbleGamers Foundation

Accessibility is an elusive subject when it comes to universal design. When I talk about accessibility am I talking about how easy it is for an audience to access the content on different devices, how wide of a market the content can reach or literally how accessible it is?

The word gets thrown around a lot in the design industries, but when AbleGamers—a non-profit dedicated to getting people with disabilities access to video games—talks about accessibility we mean, “How much of the disability community can access your game?” Continue reading

Defining “Normal”

By Connie Horn

Normal DefinitionRecently I received a “Disability and Me” article from Zacharay Lassiter, a young man diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. His recent article A Struggle to be Normal really had me thinking about what normal is.

According to Dictionary.com, normal means: conforming to the standard or common type; usual; not abnormal; regular; natural. Continue reading

“Differently-Abled” Toy Catalog: Integrated or Segregated?

Toy BearBy Ellen Hierl

You’re making a list, checking it twice and trying desperately to figure out what to give everyone on that list.

Not an easy task for sure. But then as you go down the list you see the name of a child who has a disability, and the task of buying a gift seems even more challenging. You question whether the age guidelines on the box will apply to this child? Will the child know how to use it? Will it be safe? Basically, you just aren’t sure how to approach this.

Maybe you will just get a new sweatshirt instead. Continue reading

Answers Left Unquestioned

TASH Conf LogoBy David Morstad

So Many Answers Left Unquestioned was the theme of the most recent TASH conference in Long Beach, California. As themes go, I like it. It’s clever, insightful and actually very appropriate to this field. We have a certain legacy of leaving important issues, trends and accepted truths go unquestioned. Continue reading

When Beliefs and Reality Collide

By Connie Horn

It has been 24 hours since the phone call.

My grandson was having tests done. I was patiently waiting for the phone call to hear the results. I was also thinking about some of the behavior changes I’ve seen in him over the past few months. He used to respond when you called his name, now I can say his name over and over, with no response. Not even a glance my way. He used to let me hold and snuggle with him, now it is a struggle to get him to hug me or to sit on my lap.

Then the call came.

It is not easy to hear your grandson has autism. Continue reading

Voting: People With Intellectual Disabilities

By Ellen Hierl

We just completed national elections. Many of you exercised your right as a citizen to vote for the candidates of your choice.

But what about the people you support who have intellectual disabilities? Should they have the right to vote? Should their right to vote be limited based upon guardianship status or other measurements? If they do vote, how do we ensure they are not manipulated by people who support them?  Continue reading

What if they DIDN’T have a disability?

By Connie Horn

I’ve recently read several news articles about people with disabilities, and it made me question the motivations of media coverage and how people with disabilities are portrayed.

Headlines that caught my eye were… 

Continue reading