Trust.

By Matthew Hobson

Trust in God is a common theme heard in church. Trust is the assured reliance on someone or something.

“Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding”

(Proverbs 3:5 NIV)

This has been the verse I live by. I do not understand why I was born nonverbal with autism. The odds were so against this happening to me. I often ask myself “Why me?” Why did this happen the way it did? The thing is, I know God has a reason. Continue reading

A Prayer For National Healing

By Mark Hagen

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

I’ve been thinking of this quote by President Abraham Lincoln often this past year. We are one week removed from one of our nation’s most acrimonious and divisive elections. Pundits and “experts” are taking credit, assigning blame, and assessing what went wrong or what went right – dependent, of course, on one’s political leanings.

I happened to be in Washington, D.C. on Election Day.

Continue reading

Faith Community Involvement: What are the numbers?

By David Morstad

The numbers have been circulating for years.

  • Citing one prominent organization, a contributor to Christianity Today states, “perhaps 80% of the disabled are unchurched…”
  • A church’s website proclaims, “… 95% of those with disabilities are unchurched.”

Numbers that high certainly get our attention, create a sense of urgency and may indeed spur faith communities to action. Unfortunately, no one seems to know exactly where those numbers came from and, for a very long time, they have gone largely unquestioned. Continue reading

‘Fixing’ the Disability

By David Morstad

As Christians, themes of healing and wholeness come naturally. We seek to be compassionate and make right that which appears broken, wounded or wrong. It is a noble and blessed calling.  In the lives of people with disabilities, we see undeniable need.

But what is the curative solution we seek? Are we more likely to pray, “God, take away that person’s disability,” or to pray, “God grant me patience to listen, grant me acceptance, grant me a voice to speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, grant me forgiveness, grant me the wisdom to learn from those who have so much to teach me?” Continue reading

Challenges of Interfaith Dialogue in Disability Ministries

By Rev. Betty McManus
Ministry Consultant
Bethesda Lutheran Communities

Bethesda Lutheran Communities supports people of a variety of faith backgrounds. Honoring each person as an individual child of God requires the openness of ensuring religious choice is honored. Interestingly, in a state-wide census of all the group homes throughout Wisconsin, it was discovered 30% of the people Bethesda supports have a Catholic faith background – yet Bethesda was only in partnership with three Catholic churches. Continue reading

Valuing Life, Preventing Suffering: A Central Tension in Genetic Screening for Disability

By Ellen Painter Dollar
Author, No Easy Choice: A Story of Disability, Parenthood, and Faith in an Age of Advanced Reproduction

I am writing this post from a hotel in Arlington, Virginia, where I am attending a conference of people with my genetic bone disorder, osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a collagen disorder that leads to fragile bones, skeletal deformities, and other symptoms. As I always find when I attend these conferences, the greatest benefit does not come from learning about the latest research or functional adaptations. Rather, it comes from being surrounded, as I so rarely am, with people who look and function as I do. Continue reading

Veronica- The True Image

By Ben Conner

In the practice of iconography, the writer (the one who paints the icon) transmits the Tradition of the church and proclaims the gospel.

By means of the postures of the people in the icon, the inverse perspective of the scene, and the sanctifying prayers that recognize the sacramental possibilities of the icon, the viewer of the icon is drawn into communion with that which is depicted and is given a glimpse into the Kingdom. Continue reading